Friday, February 3, 2012

wondering thoughts...

I made peanut butter honey toast for the boys.  Noah and Adrian both grabbed at the same piece and held it in a tug-of-war mid air.  Adrian wailed "He's taking the biggest one!" He looked at me for some sympathy and maybe hopes that I would give Noah a glare for being selfish.  I just looked at Adrian's hand on the other side of the toast and back at his little face so filled with unjust anger.  Adrian was doing the exact same thing he was accusing his brother of.  Sure, they're kids.  Yet...it seems we don't automatically outgrow this behavior.  The verse about not judging the speck in your brother's eye came to mind but...it doesn't fit this wrong for same wrong situation, not really.  God says that we judge others and that the speck we see isn't just mirrored in our own glazed over view...but rather much much bigger.  The stuff we hone in on is so slight, so back seat compared to the biggest possible blind spot we could incur.  It is possible for us to be born...to grow...to be surrounded by the created world in all it's wonder...to be wispered to by God's convicting spirit and yet-completely miss God, to turn the other way.  To be blind to God.  To not hear Him, see Him or even care unless we feel there has been an injustice dealt to us.  We point our fingers at this and that based on what we feel is right...as if there is  such a thing as "right" without God.  We are so self consumed...not just in our own happiness, but in our own needs, fears, and insecurities that we can be lost into a world of total blindness.  I don't know how big a beam is meant to be in the verse referenced, but I think it's bigger than any human can see around without outside intervention to remove it.  Get rid of it.  Once we see it slide out of the way on a wave of grace...catch the smallest glimpse of who God is...we won't fight over toast anymore.

Matthew 7:3
And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?



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